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Daniel Barenboim led the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s first South American tour—the fortieth international tour—in October 2000, with stops in Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, and Barenboim’s hometown of Buenos Aires.

Barenboim and the Orchestra onstage at the Sala São Paulo on October 5, 2000 (Greg Morton photo)

October 4, 2000 – Teatro Municipal, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
October 5, 2000 – Sala São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
MOZART Piano Concerto No. 25 in C Major, K. 503
MAHLER Symphony No. 1 in D Major
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

October 6, 2000 – Sala São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
October 12, 2000 – Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires, Argentina
MAHLER Symphony No. 7
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Program book for the three concerts at the Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires in October 2000

October 7, 2000 – Sala São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
October 11, 2000 – Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires, Argentina
DEBUSSY Prelude to The Afternoon of a Faun
DEBUSSY La mer
FALLA The Three-Cornered Hat
Alejandra Malvino, mezzo-soprano
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

October 10, 2000 – Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires, Argentina
MOZART Piano Concerto No. 25 in C Major, K. 503
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Major
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

The Orchestra’s nineteenth European tour included concerts in London, Berlin, and Vienna, and one of the concerts in Lucerne featured the world premiere of Noesis, a new work by Swiss composer Hanspeter Kyburz.

September 7, 2001 – Royal Albert Hall, London, England
WAGNER Overture to Tannhäuser
CARTER Partita
MAHLER Symphony No. 1 in D Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Barenboim and the Orchestra onstage at the Philharmonie in Berlin on September 9, 2001

September 8, 2001 – Royal Albert Hall, London, England
Daniel Barenboim, conductor
THOMAS Aurora
Micaela Haslam, soprano
MAHLER Symphony No. 7
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

September 9, 2001 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
September 15, 2001 – Musikverein, Vienna, Austria
September 16, 2001 – Musikverein, Vienna, Austria
MAHLER Symphony No. 7
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 11, 2001Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
SMITH/Stock The Star-Spangled Banner
MAHLER Symphony No. 7
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 12, 2001 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
CARTER Partita
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 13, 2001 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
KYBURZ Noesis for Large Orchestra
MAHLER Symphony No. 1 in D Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

During the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s twentieth European tour, Barenboim conducted Bruckner’s Fourth, Seventh, and Ninth symphonies on three concerts at the Lucerne Festival.

Luggage sticker for the 2002 tour to Lucerne

September 13, 2002 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
BOULEZ Notations for Orchestra I-IV and VII
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 14, 2002 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
MOZART Piano Concerto No. 24 in C Minor, K. 491
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 in E Major
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

September 15, 2002 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major, BWV 1048
BOULEZ Originel from . . . explosante-fixe . . .
Mathieu Dufour, flute
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 9 in D Minor
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

The Orchestra’s twenty-first European tour, to the annual Festtage in Berlin, featured Barenboim leading Mahler song cycles and Bruckner symphonies.

Program page for the April 17, 2003, concert in Berlin

April 17, 2003 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
MAHLER Kindertotenlieder
Thomas Quasthoff, bass-baritone
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 18, 2003 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
MAHLER Songs of a Wayfarer
Thomas Hampson, baritone
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 in E Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 19, 2003 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
MAHLER Rückert Lieder
Violeta Urmana, mezzo-soprano
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 9 in D Minor
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Returning again to the Lucerne Festival for the twenty-second European tour, the Orchestra performed several Strauss tone poems under Barenboim’s baton.

Program book for the three concerts in Lucerne in September 2003

September 13, 2003 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
STRAUSS Don Juan, Op. 20
MOZART Piano Concerto No. 23 in A Major, K. 488
MUNDRY Panorama ciego
STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Op. 28
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

September 14, 2003 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
SCHOENBERG Transfigured Night, Op. 4
STRAUSS Death and Transfiguration, Op. 24
WAGNER Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan and Isolde
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 15, 2003 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
WAGNER Overture to Tannhäuser
SCHOENBERG Variations for Orchestra, Op. 31
STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Robert Chen, violin
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

The following month, Barenboim and the Orchestra traveled to Japan for the fifth Asian tour. The final concerts of the tour in Tokyo included works by Stravinsky and Ravel in a collaboration with the Tokyo Ballet, featuring Sylvie Guillem in Ravel’s Boléro.

Program book for the October 29, 2003, concert in Fukuoka

October 24, 2003 – Bunka Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan
October 27, 2003 – Festival Hall, Osaka, Japan
MAHLER Symphony No. 9 in D Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

October 26, 2003 – Bunka Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan
WAGNER Overture to Tannhäuser
SCHOENBERG Variations for Orchestra, Op. 31
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 5 in E Minor, Op. 64
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

October 26, 2003 – Bunka Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan
October 29, 2003 – Fukuoka Symphony Hall, Fukuoka, Japan
WAGNER Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan and Isolde
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 in E Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

November 1, 2003 – Bunka Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan
RAVEL Pavane pour une infante défunte
STRAUSS Death and Transfiguration, Op. 24
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74 (Pathétique)
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Tokyo

November 2, 2003 – Bunka Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan
November 3, 2003 – Bunka Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan
STRAVINSKY The Rite of Spring
STRAVINSKY The Firebird Suite
RAVEL Boléro
Tokyo Ballet
Sylvie Guillem, dancer
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

At the 2004 Festtage in Berlin, Barenboim led the Orchestra in works by Schoenberg—the Piano Concerto, Violin Concerto, and Variations for Orchestra—paired with Tchaikovsky’s final three symphonies.

April 7, 2004 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major, BWV 1048
SCHOENBERG Piano Concerto, Op. 42
Peter Serkin, piano
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 5 in E Minor, Op. 64
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 8, 2004 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BACH Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B Minor, BWV 1067
SCHOENBERG Violin Concerto, Op. 36
Nikolaj Znaider, violin
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 4 in F Minor, Op. 36
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 9, 2004 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BACH Concerto for Two Pianos in C Major, BWV 1061
Peter Serkin, piano
SCHOENBERG Variations for Orchestra, Op. 31
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74 (Pathétique)
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

Pierre Boulez joined Barenboim for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s twenty-fourth European tour that included performances in Germany, Austria, Hungary, and England. Concerts at the Berlin Festtage—entitled Hommage à Pierre Boulez—celebrated Boulez’s eightieth birthday.

Catalog for the Budapest Spring Festival in 2005

March 24, 2005 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
RAVEL Rapsodie espagnole
BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 2
Lang Lang, piano
BOULEZ Originel from . . . explosante-fixe . . .
Mathieu Dufour, flute
RAVEL Mother Goose Suite
RAVEL Daphnis and Chloe Suite No. 2
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

March 25, 2005 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
March 31, 2005 – National Philharmonic Hall, Budapest, Hungary
April 4, 2005 – Royal Festival Hall, London, England
BARTÓK Four Pieces for Orchestra
BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 1
Daniel Barenboim, piano
BARTÓK Concerto for Orchestra
Pierre Boulez, conductor

Catalog for the 2005 Festtage in Berlin—Hommage à Pierre Boulez

March 26, 2005 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 3
Mitsuko Uchida, piano
MAHLER Symphony No. 9
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

March 30, 2005 – Musikverein, Vienna, Austria
April 1, 2005 – National Philharmonic Hall, Budapest, Hungary
April 3, 2005 – Royal Festival Hall, London, England
April 5, 2005 – Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, England
April 6, 2005 – Symphony Hall, Birmingham, England
MAHLER Symphony No. 9
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Daniel Barenboim’s final tour—the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s twenty-fifth European and forty-eighth international tour—as ninth music director was a return to the Lucerne Festival.

Program book cover for the September 2005 concerts in Lucerne

September 16, 2005 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
MAHLER Symphony No. 9 in D Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 17, 2005 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
WAGNER Prelude to Parsifal
SCHOENBERG Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 9 in D Minor
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 18, 2005 – Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
FALLA Nights in the Gardens of Spain
ALBÉNIZ Evocación from Iberia
RAVEL Rapsodie espagnole
RAVEL Pavane pour une infante défunte
RAVEL Alborada del gracioso
RAVEL Boléro
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

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Before and during his tenure as the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s ninth music director, Daniel Barenboim was firmly committed to introducing new works to Chicago audiences. He also was instrumental in the continued cultivation of the Orchestra’s composer-in-residence program, frequently conducting works by John Corigliano, Shulamit Ran, and Augusta Read Thomas. With the Orchestra, Barenboim led over thirty world and U.S. premieres, and a complete list is below (all performances in Orchestra Hall, unless otherwise noted; an asterisk (*) indicates a work commissioned by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra).

Barenboim and John Corigliano review the score to his Symphony no. 1 in March 1990 (Terry’s photo)

World premieres

March 8, 1990
*Tōru Takemitsu Visions
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

March 15, 1990
*John Corigliano Symphony No. 1
Stephen Hough, piano
John Sharp, cello
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 14, 1990 (Edman Memorial Chapel, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois)
*Stephen Kowalsky Last Voyage
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Barenboim acknowledges Shulamit Ran following the world premiere of her Legends on October 7, 1993 (Jim Steere photo)

April 30, 1991
*Ellen Taaffe Zwilich Concerto for Bass Trombone, Strings, Timpani, and Cymbals
Charles Vernon, bass trombone
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

February 4, 1993
*Melinda Wagner Falling Angels
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

October 7, 1993
*Shulamit Ran Legends for Orchestra
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Barenboim and the Orchestra acknowledge Elliott Carter following the world premiere of his Partita on February 17, 1994 (Jim Steere photo)

February 17, 1994
*Elliott Carter Partita
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

October 12, 1995
*York Höller Aura
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

January 30, 1997
*Jay Alan Yim Rough Magic
Daniel Barenboim

May 15, 1997
*Aribert Reimann Violin Concerto
Gidon Kremer, violin
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

February 5, 1998
*Sir Harrison Birtwistle Exody
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

February 12, 1998
Max Raimi Elegy
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Two pages of Pierre Boulez’s manuscript score for Notations VII

January 14, 1999
*Pierre Boulez Notations VII for Orchestra
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

February 11, 1999
Elias Tanenbaum First Bassman for Contrabass and Orchestra
Joseph Guastafeste, bass
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

January 6, 2000
*Augusta Read Thomas Ceremonial
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 13, 2001 (Kultur- & Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland)
*Hanspeter Kyburz Noesis for Large Orchestra
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 27, 2001
*Elliott Carter Cello Concerto
Yo-Yo Ma, cello
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Texts for the first two sections of Bernard Rands’s apókryphos, as included in the printed score

May 8, 2003
*Bernard Rands apókryphos
Angela Denoke, soprano
Chicago Symphony Chorus
Duain Wolfe, director
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 22, 2003
*Melinda Wagner Extremity of Sky (Concerto for Piano and Orchestra)
Emanuel Ax, piano
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 29, 2003
Elliott Carter Of Rewaking
Michelle DeYoung, mezzo-soprano
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

October 9, 2003
*Lalo Schifrin Fantasy for Screenplay and Orchestra
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 19, 2005
*George Benjamin Dance Figures (Nine choreographic scenes for orchestra)
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Title page detail for Augusta Read Thomas’s score for Astral Canticle

October 6, 2005
*Elliott Carter Soundings
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

February 16, 2006
*Isabel Mundry Nocturno
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

June 1, 2006
*Augusta Read Thomas Astral Canticle
Mathieu Dufour, flute
Robert Chen, violin
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

United States premieres

November 7, 1985
Siefgried Wagner Sehnsucht
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 9, 1991
Pierre Boulez Four movements from Le visage nuptial
(I. Conduite; II. Gravité. L’emmuré; IV. Evadné; and V. Post-scriptum)
Phyllis Bryn-Julson, soprano
Lucy Shelton, soprano
Women of the Chicago Symphony Chorus
Margaret Hillis, director
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

In 1995, Teldec released recordings of three CSO world premieres, all conducted by Barenboim: Carter’s Partita, Berio’s Continuo, and Takemitsu’s Visions.

May 16, 1991
Edison Denisov Symphonie pour grande orchestra
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

January 7, 1993
*Luciano Berio Continuo
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

October 1, 1998
Rodion Shchedrin Concerto cantabile
Maxim Vengerov, violin
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 30, 1999
*Wolfgang Rihm Sotto voce
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

Barenboim with Augusta Read Thomas during a rehearsal for the world premiere of her Aurora—co-commissioned by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Berlin Philharmonic—in Berlin in June 2000

February, 24, 2000
Elliott Carter What Next?
Simone Nold, soprano
Lynne Dawson, soprano
Hilary Summers, contralto
William Joyner, tenor
Hanno Müller-Brachmann, bass-baritone
Michael John Devine, boy soprano
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 21, 2000
*Augusta Read Thomas Aurora
Elizabeth Norman, soprano
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

October 4, 2001
*Isabel Mundry Panorama ciego
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

December 13, 2001
Wilhelm Furtwängler Symphony No. 2 in E Minor
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

For the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s twelfth tour to Europe, Daniel Barenboim led three concerts at the Philharmonie in Berlin, in conjunction with the 1996 Easter Festival (Festtage).

Barenboim leads the Orchestra at the Philharmonie in Berlin on on April 3, 1996 (Monika Rittershaus photo)

April 3, 1996 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
LISZT Piano Concerto No. 1 in E-flat Major
Martha Argerich, piano
BERLIOZ Symphonie fantastique, Op. 14
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 5, 1996 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
WAGNER Prelude to Act 1 and Good Friday Music from Parsifal*
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 8 in C Minor
Daniel Barenboim, conductor
*Argerich originally was scheduled to perform Liszt’s Totentanz, but she canceled due to illness.

April 6, 1996 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
LISZT Piano Concerto No. 2 in A Major
Martha Argerich, piano
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 5 in E Minor, Op. 64
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Barenboim and the Orchestra returned to Europe later that same year, for a five-concert tour to England and Ireland. Sir Georg Solti led the fourth concert of the tour on September 13—Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony as part of at The Proms.

September 8, 1996 – Symphony Hall, Birmingham, England
September 14, 1996 – Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, England
VERDI Overture to La forza del destino
ELGAR Falstaff, Op. 68
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 5 in E Minor, Op. 64
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Program book for the September 12, 1996, concert at the Royal Albert Hall

September 9, 1996 – National Concert Hall, Dublin, Ireland
September 12, 1996 – Royal Albert Hall, London, England
SCHOENBERG Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 8 in C Minor
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

The Orchestra’s fourteenth European tour included stops in Germany and France, with three Festtage concerts in Berlin.

June 4, 1997 – Kölner Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
June 5, 1997 – Kölner Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
REIMANN Violin Concerto
Gidon Kremer, violin
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

June 6, 1997 – Roncalliplatz, Cologne, Germany
GERSHWIN Cuban Overture
GERSHWIN Concerto in F for Piano and Orchestra
William Eddins, piano
GERSHWIN Rhapsody in Blue
William Eddins, piano
GERSHWIN An American in Paris
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Vengerov rehearses Sibelius’s Violin Concerto under Barenboim’s baton at the Philharmonie in Cologne on June 8, 1997 (Klaus Rudolph photo)

June 8, 1997 – Kölner Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
June 9, 1997 – Kölner Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
HÖLLER Aura
Daniel Barenboim, conductor
SIBELIUS Violin Concerto in D Minor, Op. 47
Maxim Vengerov, violin
Daniel Barenboim, conductor
FALLA Nights in the Gardens of Spain
Daniel Barenboim, piano
Plácido Domingo, conductor

June 10, 1997 – Gewandhaus, Leipzig, Germany
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Domingo congratulates Barenboim following a performance of Falla’s Nights in the Gardens of Spain at the Philharmonie in Cologne on June 8, 1997 (Astrid Kessler photo)

Barenboim and the Orchestra again returned to Berlin’s Festtage in the spring of 1998 for the fifteenth European tour

April 2, 1998 – Châtelet Théâtre Musical de Paris, Paris, France
WAGNER Prelude to Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
BERG Three Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6
BRAHMS Symphony No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 98
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 3, 1998 – Châtelet Théâtre Musical de Paris, Paris, France
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 6, 1998 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BRAHMS Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77
Maxim Vengerov, violin
BRAHMS Symphony No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 98
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 7, 1998 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BERG Three Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 8, 1998 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
SCHUMANN Piano Concerto in A Minor, Op. 54
Jonathan Gilad, piano
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 in E Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Program book for the September 5, 1998, concert in Birmingham’s Symphony Hall

The second trip to Europe in 1998 featured stops in England, Switzerland, Belgium, Germany, Austria, and the Orchestra’s first appearances in Romania.

September 3, 1998 – Royal Albert Hall, London, England
BIRTWISTLE Exody
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 4, 1998 – Royal Albert Hall, London, England
September 5, 1998 – Symphony Hall, Birmingham, England
September 11, 1998 – Kultur and Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Op. 28
BERG Three Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6 in E Minor, Op. 64 (Pathétique)
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 7, 1998 – Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels, Belgium
BERG Three Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Program book for the September 16, 1998, concert at the Musikvereinsaal in Vienna

September 8, 1998 – Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels, Belgium
WAGNER Prelude to Lohengrin
SCHOENBERG Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6 in E Minor, Op. 64 (Pathétique)
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 9, 1998 – Festspielhaus, Baden-Baden, Germany
September 15, 1998 – Musikverein, Vienna, Austria
SCHOENBERG Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 12, 1998 – Kultur and Kongresszentrum, Lucerne, Switzerland
SCHOENBERG Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16
WAGNER Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan and Isolde
BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 14, 1998 – Philharmonie am Gasteig, Munich, Germany
WAGNER Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan and Isolde
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Program book for the spring 1999 Festtage in Berlin

September 16, 1998 – Musikverein, Vienna, Austria
September 18, 1998 – Sala Mare a Palatului, Bucharest, Romania
WAGNER Prelude to Lohengrin
BERG Three Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6 in E Minor, Op. 64 (Pathétique)
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

September 19, 1998 – Sala Mare a Palatului, Bucharest, Romania
SCHUMANN Piano Concerto in A Minor, Op. 54
Radu Lupu, piano
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

For the 1999 Festtage , Barenboim invited the Chicago Symphony Chorus to join the Orchestra for two concerts in Berlin, including Pierre Boulez leading Schoenberg’s Moses und Aron on April 1.

March 31, 1999 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BRAHMS A German Requiem, Op. 45
Dorothea Röschmann, soprano
Thomas Quasthoff, baritone
Chicago Symphony Chorus
Duain Wolfe, director
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Program book for the April 27 and 28, 2000, concerts in Cologne’s Philharmonie

April 3, 1999 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
STRAUSS Don Juan, Op. 20
STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Op. 28
STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

The Orchestra’s eighteenth European tour included Barenboim leading concerts in Germany, Spain, and Portugal, with Boulez taking the reins for two concerts in Cologne.

April 21, 2000 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BRAHMS Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat Major, Op. 83
Maurizio Pollini, piano
DEBUSSY La mer
BOULEZ Notations for Orchestra I-IV, VII
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 22, 2000 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
BRAHMS Piano Concerto No. 1 in D Minor, Op. 15
Radu Lupu, piano
STRAVINSKY The Rite of Spring
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Luggage sticker for the 2000 tour to Europe

April 27, 2000 – Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
April 28, 2000 – Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
BOULEZ Notations for Orchestra I-IV, VII
DEBUSSY La mer
FALLA The Three-Cornered Hat
Elisabete Matos, mezzo-soprano
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 30, 2000 – Palau de la Musica, Barcelona, Spain
May 1, 2000 – Auditoria Nacional de la Musica, Madrid, Spain
May 3, 2000 – Coliseu dos Recreios, Lisbon, Portugal
MAHLER Symphony No. 5
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 2, 2000 – Auditoria Nacional de la Musica, Madrid, Spain
DEBUSSY Prelude to The Afternoon of a Faun
DEBUSSY La mer
FALLA The Three-Cornered Hat
Elisabete Matos, mezzo-soprano
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Luggage sticker for the 1992 tour to Europe

During his first season as the Chicago Symphony’s ninth music director, Daniel Barenboim led the Orchestra’s eighth European tour in April 1992, with stops in England, France, Germany, and Spain.

April 7, 1992 – Auditorio Nacional, Madrid, Spain
April 14, 1992 – Théâtre du Chatelet, Paris, France
April 15, 1992 – Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
April 16, 1992 – Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
STRAUSS Don Juan, Op. 20
STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Op. 28
STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 8, 1992 – Auditorio Nacional, Madrid, Spain
BEETHOVEN Leonore Overture, No. 3, Op. 72
MOZART Piano Concerto No. 17 in G Major, K. 543
CORIGLIANO Symphony No. 1
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

Barenboim and the Orchestra rehearse Mozart’s Piano Concerto no. 17 at the Auditorio Nacional in Madrid on April 7, 1992 (Agustin Muñoz photo)

April 10, 1992 – Royal Festival Hall, London, England
BEETHOVEN Leonore Overture, No. 3, Op. 72
MOZART Piano Concerto No. 17 in G Major, K. 543
STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

April 11, 1992 – Royal Festival Hall, London, England
CORIGLIANO Symphony No. 1
WAGNER Excerpts from Götterdämmerung
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

April 13, 1992 – Théâtre du Chatelet, Paris, France
BEETHOVEN Leonore Overture, No. 3, Op. 72
MOZART Piano Concerto No. 17 in G Major, K. 543
WAGNER Excerpts from Götterdämmerung
Daniel Barenboim, piano and conductor

Music director laureate Sir Georg Solti and Barenboim shared conducting duties with the Orchestra at the 1992 Salzburg Whitsun Festival. Solti led concerts on June 6 and 8, and Barenboim conducted one concert on June 7.

The Orchestra appeared at the Salzburg Whitsun Festival in 1992, during Sir Georg Solti’s first of three seasons as artistic director.

June 7, 1992 – Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg, Austria
BERLIOZ Roman Carnival Overture, Op. 9
LISZT A Symphony to Dante’s Divine Comedy
Anna Korondi, soprano
Women of the Arnold Schoenberg Choir
Erwin Ortner, director
WAGNER Excerpts from Götterdämmerung
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

For the Orchestra’s tenth trip to Europe in 1993, Solti opened the tour by leading a single concert in Salzburg on May 29, during his second season as artistic director of the Whitsun Festival. Barenboim took the baton for the remaining two concerts in Austria and then on to Spain for stops in Barcelona, Madrid, Santiago, and Valencia.

May 30, 1993 – Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg, Austria
June 2, 1993 – Auditorio Nacional, Madrid, Spain
June 8, 1993 – Palau de la Música, Valencia, Spain
HAYDN Symphony No. 48 in C Major (Maria Theresa)
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Sir Georg Solti and Barenboim in Salzburg on May 29, 1993 (Jim Steere photo)

May 31, 1993 – Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg, Austria
June 5, 1993 – Auditorio de Galicia, Santiago, Spain
June 9, 1993 – Palau de la Música, Barcelona, Spain
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 5 in B-flat Major
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

June 3, 1993 – Auditorio Nacional, Madrid, Spain
June 6, 1993 – Auditorio de Galicia, Santiago, Spain
BRAHMS Symphony No. 3 in F Major, Op. 90
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 4 in F Minor, Op. 36
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Barenboim opened the Orchestra’s eleventh European tour in Berlin, followed by Solti leading two concerts in Salzburg during his final season as Whitsun Festival artistic director. Barenboim and the Orchestra then traveled on to Vienna, Frankfurt, Paris, Cologne, and London.

Barenboim and the Orchestra in Salzburg’s Grosses Festspielhaus in May 1993 (Jim Steere photo)

May 19, 1994 – Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany
DEBUSSY La mer
STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Op. 28
BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 73
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 21, 1994 – Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg, Austria
BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 in in D Major, Op. 73
STRAVINSKY The Rite of Spring
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Program book for the May 25, 1994, concert at the Musikvereinsaal in Vienna

May 25, 1994 – Musikvereinsaal, Vienna, Austria
DEBUSSY La mer
STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Op. 28
STRAVINSKY The Rite of Spring
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 26, 1994 – Alte Oper, Frankfurt, Germany
DEBUSSY La mer
STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Op. 28
BRAHMS Symphony No. 4 in in E Minor, Op. 98
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 27, 1994 – Alte Oper, Frankfurt, Germany
BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 in in D Major, Op. 73
STRAVINSKY The Rite of Spring
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 29, 1994 – Le Châtelet Théâtre Musical, Paris, France
CARTER Partita
DEBUSSY La mer
BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 in in D Major, Op. 73
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Program page for the May 31 and June 1, 1994, concerts at the Philharmonie in Cologne

May 31, 1994 – Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
June 1, 1994 – Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
CARTER Partita
DEBUSSY La mer
STRAVINSKY The Rite of Spring
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

June 2, 1994 – Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
June 3, 1994 – Philharmonie, Cologne, Germany
BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 in in D Major, Op. 73
BRAHMS Symphony No. 4 in in E Minor, Op. 98
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

June 4, 1994 – Royal Festival Hall, London, England
CARTER Partita
STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Op. 28
BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 in in D Major, Op. 73
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

For the Orchestra’s fourth tour to Asia, Barenboim and the ensemble traveled to Japan for concerts in Hamamatsu, Niigata, Osaka, Takamatsu, and Tokyo. Principal guest conductor Pierre Boulez led one concert in Tokyo with Barenboim at the piano.

May 26, 1995 – Act City, Hamamatsu, Japan
WAGNER Prelude to Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
SCHOENBERG Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16
STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Luggage sticker for the 1995 tour to Japan

May 27, 1995 – Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Tokyo, Japan
SCHOENBERG Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16
BOULEZ Notations for Orchestra I-IV
STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 29, 1995 – Suntory Hall, Tokyo, Japan
CARTER Partita
LUTOSŁAWSKI Concerto for Orchestra
RAVEL Rapsodie espagnole
RAVEL Boléro
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 30, 1995 – Kenmin Hall, Niigata, Japan
June 3, 1995 – Kagawa Kenmin Hall, Takamatsu, Japan
June 6, 1995 – Bunka Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan
WAGNER Prelude to Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
WAGNER Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde
STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

May 31, 1995 – Suntory Hall, Tokyo, Japan
WEBERN Passacaglia, Op. 1
WEBERN Six Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6
BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 1
Daniel Barenboim, piano
BERIO Sinfonia
Swingle Singers
Pierre Boulez, conductor

June 2, 1995 – Festival Hall, Osaka, Japan
June 5, 1995 – Suntory Hall, Tokyo, Japan
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 8 in C Minor
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Daniel Barenboim (Don Getsug photo)

On November 15, 2017, Daniel Barenboim—the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s ninth music director—will celebrate his seventy-fifth birthday. To commemorate this milestone, we will be posting a series of articles highlighting many of his activities with the Orchestra, including recordings, international tours, world and U.S. premieres, and more.

Barenboim’s history in Chicago began on January 19, 1958, when the fifteen-year-old pianist first performed a solo recital in Orchestra Hall. When he returned that fall for a second engagement, he attended his first CSO concert that included sixth music director Fritz Reiner leading Richard Strauss’s Ein Heldenleben. In his autobiography A Life in Music, Barenboim recounted that, “nothing I had heard in Europe or elsewhere had prepared me for the shock of the precision, the volume, and the intensity of the Chicago orchestra. It was like a perfect machine with a beating human heart.”

Fritz Reiner leading the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on October 30 and 31, 1958

In June 1965, Barenboim made his debut with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at the Ravinia Festival in Beethoven’s First Piano Concerto with André Previn, and in February 1969, he first appeared with the Orchestra in Orchestra Hall in Bartók’s First Piano Concerto with Pierre Boulez. He first conducted the Orchestra on November 4, 1970, at Michigan State University, and the first work on the program was Dvořák’s Cello Concerto with Jacqueline du Pré; a week later, they recorded it in Medinah Temple.

In February 1989, it was announced that Daniel Barenboim would succeed Sir Georg Solti to become the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s ninth music director, beginning in the 1991-92 season.

Stay tuned!

This article also appears here.

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association offers a variety of internships in all departments, and we are always lucky to engage young, smart, and eager individuals—current students and recent graduates—from all disciplines. Working here can provide an in-depth look at not only the Orchestra’s rich history but also insight into the day-to-day operations of a performing arts organization. We recently reached out to former Rosenthal Archives interns to see what they have been up to . . .

Stephen Abitbol

A digital cinema graduate from DePaul University, Stephen Abitbol processed audio and video recording collections in the archives. “It was incredible to see how much dedication, love, and patience it takes from each musician to work as a whole to create a unique sound. It helped me understand how important it is to work as a team in my personal and professional relationships to grow together.” Stephen currently lives in Haifa, Israel, working as a digital marketer in a variety of startups. This fall, he is a full-time student there in language school to learn Hebrew.

Kathryn Antonelli

After her recent tenure in the archives, Kathryn Antonelli completed internships at Princeton University and the University of Hawaii, working with born-digital and moving-image collections. “Working at the CSO was what opened the doors to these amazing new experiences, and I am so glad I had the opportunity to spend a season there.” She will soon graduate from the University of South Carolina with her master of library and information science degree (MLIS) and plans to reside and work in Philadelphia.

Sierra Campbell

Sierra Campbell completed degrees in fine arts from Harold Washington College and English literature from the University of Illinois at Chicago before earning an MLIS degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. “Working at the CSO impacted both my personal and professional paths, as I was able to meet the friendly employees and volunteers. They were all so gracious and willing to help out in any way, and no act of recognition was too small to have been noticed.” Sierra currently works at Fox College, managing libraries on two campuses.

Kerry Fulara

Kerry Fulara earned a bachelor’s degree in history from Michigan State University and an MLIS (with a specialization in archives, preservation, and records management) degree from the University of Pittsburgh. Following her internship, she worked with Rush Hour Concerts and formally established its archives. “My time at the CSO taught me the importance and benefits of networking, connecting with people, and building relationships.” Kerry later worked as a records manager and now as a real estate analyst with Invenergy. Continuing her archival work, she currently volunteers with the Richard H. Driehaus Museum, developing its restoration archive.

John Garvens (Sarah Pemberton photo)

Since working in the archives, John Garvens has transitioned from music to retail to fitness to software to advertising to consulting while serving in the U.S. Army Reserve as a trombone player from 2004 until 2016. He especially remembers two visitors to the archives, Yo-Yo Ma and Pierre Boulez. “Both men were musical heroes of mine; it was an honor to meet them. It also was really cool to archive the media from Riccardo Muti’s earliest years with the CSO.” John earned a bachelor of music degree in trombone performance from Illinois State University.

Matthew Greenman (reverb.com photo)

Matthew Greenman completed a bachelor of music degree in performing arts management from DePaul University in 2016 before his CSO internships in the archives and the marketing department. “My time in the archives greatly enhanced my organizational skills, formed my fascination of and appreciation for the orchestra, and rekindled my love of live music.” Matthew later worked as a listings coordinator at reverb.com in Lakeview, and he is preparing to take the exam to join the New York City Fire Department.

Andrew Lyon (E. Lyon photo)

After earning his bachelor’s degree in saxophone performance from Illinois State University, Andrew Lyon joined the staff, processing and cataloguing the Margaret Hillis score collection. He later completed a master’s degree in orchestral conducting from Butler University and has since returned to the archives on numerous occasions to utilize the score and audio collections. In the archives, “once you’re a part of it, you’re a part for life. You have your own page in the CSO history books.” Andrew currently is artistic and music director of The 65th Street Klezmorim and on faculty at Ivy Tech Community College.

Elliot Mandel (Dawn Mueller photo)

Before working for the American Library Association and Rush Hour Concerts, as well as writing classical concert reviews for local websites, Elliot Mandel graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English and creative writing from Bradley University. “I loved my time in the archives, getting to know the rich history of the orchestra that I have enjoyed seeing perform since I was a kid.” He has since started his own photography business, where his clients include the Chicago Children’s Choir, Chicago Philharmonic, Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Eighth Blackbird, Kurt Elling, Spektral Quartet, and the Collaborative Arts Institute of Chicago.

Brian Maloney

“Working in the archives taught me an appreciation and understanding for how people can work together to create one cohesive production for all to enjoy and always instilled in me a deep sense of awe and respect for the CSO’s rich historical tapestry,” remembers Brian Maloney, who earned a bachelor’s degree in music education from Saint Xavier University. He currently holds multiple band director and instructor jobs in the Chicago suburbs, with School District 95, Divine Providence School, Soli Deo Gloria Brass Band, and Evergreen Park Community High School.

Shridar Mani

Shridar Mani completed a bachelor’s degree in music (with honors) from the University of Chicago while an intern in the archives, where one of his projects was processing and cataloguing a collection of manuscripts by Chicago composer William Lester (see here and here). After graduation, he returned home to Singapore where he has worked for the past several years as a programming officer at the Esplanade–Theatres on the Bay, producing a wide variety of concerts in all genres. “Working at the CSO helped me realize that working in the arts was a calling, and it has led to my career for the past six years and many more to come.”

Charles Russell Roberts (Mike Grittani photo)

With degrees from the University of Florida and the Eastman School of Music, Charles Russell Roberts currently is finishing a master’s degree in performing arts administration at Roosevelt University. “The archives internship was my first foray into working at a cultural institution in a capacity beyond the stage, and it gave me a deep understanding and respect for the integrity and preservation of not only physical archives but also the importance of records and data in understanding how an organization changes over time.” Charles—also an alumnus of the Civic Orchestra of Chicago—currently balances a full-time job as a project manager with Grenzebach Glier and Associates with performances with the Gaudete Brass Quintet.

Andrew Song

Before completing a bachelor of arts degree in biological sciences from the University of Chicago, Andrew Song worked at the CSO as an archives intern and patron services associate. “I gained strong insight into how a large organization can foster meaningful long-term relationships with its patrons as well as nurture its community through education and outreach . . . I also realized, for the first time, the greater institutional sense of community oriented self-efficacy: a pride that I was part of a great organization that made such fantastic concerts possible for the sake of our audience members.” Andrew currently is a student at Harvard Medical School.

Gregory Starr

“Working with the archives really strengthened my attention to detail,” remembers Gregory Starr, whose internship helped fulfill a class requirement for his bachelor’s degree in music business from Western Illinois University. Once after assisting with an exhibit, he mentioned that he “enjoyed getting to see more of our own collection and getting to show it off to others.” He continued to volunteer with the CSO as he worked toward a degree in digital forensics and network security at Elgin Community College, and he recently took a position as a technology support specialist—concentrating on networking troubleshooting and architecture—at The Packaging Wholesalers.

Jack Vishneski

Jack Vishneski studied history (with minors in ethnomusicology and music) at Beloit College and was working as a freelance audio engineer and singer when he began his internship in the archives, where he learned about “the value of cultivating institutional memory, especially as a key component of the storytelling needed to (at minimum) survive and (one hopes) thrive in the non-profit arts sector.” Jack completed a master’s degree in musicology from the University of Minnesota, and he and his wife are expecting their first child in November.

Joe White

Following his internship in the archives, Joe White earned a master’s degree in composition from the Conservatory of Music at Brooklyn College and has been active in the New York music and theater scene ever since. “Working at CSO right after undergrad was very affirming on many levels, as it provided confirmation that I wanted to seek out, and participate in, artistic communities. I learned that there was a place for me professionally and personally in my post-academic life.” His most recent work is the score to Alex Borinsky’s Clubbed Thumb play Of Government.

Cassandra Wilson

Cassandra Wilson completed her MLIS from Dominican University before starting her internship in the archives. “The CSO was the most amazing place to intern because I could marry my love of music with history and archives. It is also very hard to describe what it feels like to be going about your day with the life mask of Beethoven sitting on your work surface and watching over your every move!” Now residing in Houston, she freelances as a webmaster and researcher, and she currently is assisting a new company with planning and implementing its corporate archives. Cassandra also is personal assistant to her sister—opera singer and recent Richard Tucker Music Foundation award recipient—Tamara Wilson.

Riccardo Muti (Todd Rosenberg photo)

A recent Gramophone magazine article lists its fifty greatest conductors of all time, and several Chicago Symphony Orchestra titled conductors are prominently featured!

Current music director Riccardo Muti and former music directors Daniel BarenboimRafael Kubelík, Fritz Reiner, and Sir Georg Solti are squarely included, along with principal guest conductors Claudio Abbado, Pierre Boulez, and Carlo Maria Giulini; principal conductor Bernard Haitink; and Ravinia Festival music directors James Levine and Seiji Ozawa.

According to the article, “A great conductor illuminates music you thought you knew in a way that you couldn’t possibly have imagined.” Indeed.

In the spring of 1976, the major American political parties had not yet hosted their conventions to nominate candidates for president. But on May 11—the day after the first of three concerts at Carnegie Hall by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Sir Georg SoltiDonal Henahan of The New York Times had a suggestion:

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“Solti’s Chicagoans Stimulate a Yen to Yell”

It is pretty well agreed now, among decibel collectors, that the audiences at Chicago Symphony concerts make more noise than anybody. If you happen to pass Carnegie Hall tomorrow or Friday night and notice that sturdy old monument rocking slightly on its foundations, do not worry: It is only the Chicago orchestra’s fans going happily mad over a performance conducted by Sir Georg Solti. (Don’t run out to buy tickets, by the way; Chicago Symphony concerts are invariably sold out as soon as they are announced.)

The sheer fervor, somewhat resembling religious fanaticism, that characterizes the New York ovations for Chicago/Solti, is a phenomenon worth some sociologist’s study. Of course, the Chicago Symphony is one of the world’s great orchestras, and Sir Georg is undeniably one of the world’s most exciting conductors. The cheering is, therefore, aimed at real quality.

But the Dionysian frenzy that many observers have commented upon goes beyond ordinary enthusiasm into the category of the demonstration. Chicago players and Sir Georg himself have confessed that the intensity of these ovations in New York takes them aback. Thoughtful musicians cross their fingers, in fact. They have seen reputations rise and fall, for what seems too little reason either way, and know how capricious and irrational audiences can be.

The Chicago/Solti phenomenon has been compared to the cult that grew up around Toscanini and his NBC Symphony a generation ago, to the Stokowski fan clubs of his Philadelphia Orchestra years and to the von Karajan mystique in some sectors of the musical world today. Unsophisticated music listeners, with the help of judicious publicity agents, love to fasten upon an idol, to proclaim this or that artist “the greatest” and fall prostrate at mention of the holy name. Other and wiser folk simply like to cheer what they regard as the best. Cheering is an emotional purgative, a primal scream that often seems to do the screamer more good than the

The New York Times, May 11, 1976

The New York Times, May 11, 1976

Beyond the obvious fact of its lofty quality, there are several arguable rationalizations for the kind of hysteria regularly generated by the Chicago under Sir Georg. When the orchestra made its first Carnegie Hall appearances under him six years ago, many knowledgeable New Yorkers were simply flattened by what they heard. The Chicago Symphony—unlike the Cleveland under Szell, the Boston under Leinsdorf, the Philadelphia under Ormandy—had not been a regular visitor.

Fritz Reiner, who built the orchestra to its current level in the late 1950s, hated touring. He refused to do the kind of barnstorming to high prestige places that would have made the Chicago Symphony’s greatness apparent to more than the blessed few who heard it regularly in its own Orchestra Hall during Dr. Reiner’s ten‐year regime.

The fact, which Sir Georg readily admits, is that the Chicago Symphony as it stands (or sits) is largely the product of the Reiner years. The Solti genius has consisted in making splendid use of a ready‐made instrument. Not the least amazing thing about the Chicago’s current status as a symbol of excellence is that of all major American orchestras it is the oldest: Most of the players date back to the Reiner years before.

Another possible factor in the Chicago’s popularity is the high percentage of opera fans who frequent these concerts. One of Sir Georg’s first smash successes at Carnegie came in 1971 with a concert performance of Wagner’s Das Rheingold, and he subsequently offered four other operatic attractions. His sixth, on Friday night, will be The Flying Dutchman.

Sir Georg, you remember, had been artistic director of London’s Covent Garden opera house, and his renown as an opera conductor fattened considerably when he completed the first Ring cycle ever produced on commercially available recordings, for London Records. And, since opera enthusiasts on the whole are famous—or notorious, as you wish—for treating their heroes and heroines to hysterical ovations, Chicago/Solti has not suffered from being attractive to the opera set.

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Another and probably more disputable conjecture: there existed in New York at the time of the Chicago/Solti arrival on the scene, a considerable number of people who yearned to hear concerts led by an unashamedly passionate “maestro,” preferably someone cast in the Toscanini mold. To some extent, Leonard Bernstein in his early years with the Philharmonic fulfilled the needs of this sizable and vocal constituency.

But when Pierre Boulez took charge of the Philharmonic these New Yorkers missed their former feeling of audience participation. They came to regard themselves as disenfranchised musical citizens. Mr. Boulez seemed to them more acoustical scientist than performer, and his analytical talents and objective approach to music were largely unappreciated. For this emotional breed of listener, the coming of Chicago/Solti offered a chance not merely to applaud but also—almost in the political sense of the word—to demonstrate. It was as if they were sending a message.

The yen to yell can come to be as important to certain audiences as the music itself. Opera fans, in particular, seem to regard their demonstrations of affection and approbation as part of the performance, and that can be obnoxious when carried too far. But any continuing audience, such as the one attracted by the Chicago/Solti concerts, is also acting out a communal claim to eliteness. It is proclaiming its own superior taste and knowledge, as well as showing the performers how much they are appreciated: We happy few who know what’s what, we proud melomaniacs, we who make (and can easily break) heroes, salute.

In any event, the Chicago Solti ovations are likely to go down among the legends of New York’s cultural life. And perhaps the explanation is simpler than suggested here. When the inevitable ranting and raving is heard at Carnegie Hall, it may merely be one sector of the musical electorate voting for its concept of what orchestral concerts should be. The Chicago Symphony for President, as it were. Well, we could do worse.

The 1976 U.S. presidential election was held on November 2, 1976. Georgia governor Jimmy Carter, the Democratic party candidate, ran against and defeated incumbent president Gerald Ford, the Republican candidate.

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra family mourns the loss of Deborah Guscott, who was a member of the Chicago Symphony Chorus’s alto section for twenty-eight seasons. Having most recently performed in Berlioz’s Romeo and Juliet and Verdi’s Falstaff this past April under Riccardo Muti, she died on August 10, 2016, following a long illness.

Deborah Guscott (Jennifer Girard photo)

Deborah Guscott (Jennifer Girard photo)

A graduate of Oak Park and River Forest High School and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Guscott joined the Chicago Symphony Chorus at the invitation of founder and longtime director Margaret Hillis in 1987. For nearly thirty years, she regularly performed with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under three music directors—Sir Georg Solti, Daniel Barenboim, and Muti—as well as Pierre Boulez, Bernard Haitink, James Levine, Christoph Eschenbach, and James Conlon, among many others. Guscott appeared on numerous recordings—several of them Grammy Award winners—and performed in Orchestra Hall, Medinah Temple, and Carnegie Hall; at the Ravinia Festival; and on tour with the Orchestra and Chorus to London, Salzburg, and Berlin.

Guscott was a fixture on the Chicago vocal scene, performing with countless ensembles, including the Grant Park ChorusLight Opera Works, Music of the Baroque, Lyric Opera of Chicago, the Ravinia Festival Orchestra, Bach Week FestivalOriana Singers, and Chicago a cappella, among many others. She was a soloist on several occasions for the Do-it-Yourself Messiah under Hillis and with the Symphony of Oak Park and River Forest under its music director Jay Friedman. An active liturgical musician, Guscott worked at many churches and temples in the Chicagoland area, most recently as music director and cantor at both Saint Domitilla Parish in Hillside and Divine Providence Parish in Westchester.

Duain Wolfe, director of the Chicago Symphony Chorus since 1994, described his longtime colleague: “An alto with a particularly rich, luscious sound, Deb contributed significantly to the highly lauded sound of the Chicago Symphony Chorus. We are all very grateful for her gifts, both as an important musician in our ranks and as a strong, positive force who always found the silver lining in every cloud. Deb’s indomitable spirit has been an inspiration to all of us, and we will miss her greatly.”

Music director of the Symphony of Oak Park and River Forest—and CSO principal trombone—Jay Friedman added, “Deb Guscott was my go-to contralto for the past twenty years in many solo roles from opera to oratorio. She possessed a true contralto voice, something rare and perfect for Mahler, Wagner, and many other great masters. Deb was a fun person and a joy to work with—always upbeat and willing to rehearse at a moment’s notice—and she will be greatly missed.”

Christopher Bell, director of the Grant Park Chorus since 2002, shared his thoughts with the musicians of his chorus: “I was privileged to have Deb—a well known and beloved singer in Chicago—in the Grant Park Chorus and honored to be able to call her a friend. My abiding memory of my last visit with her will be of much laughter and hilarity, as we shared many memories and reminiscences. The Chicago singing community is a strong and closely knit one, and I know that you, like me, are saddened and shocked by this loss of one of our own. Today, I am thinking of you all and sharing your sorrow.”

There will be a service in her memory given at Our Lady of Sorrows Basilica (3121 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 60612) on Saturday, September 3, 2016, beginning at 11:00 a.m. The upcoming Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus performances of Brahms’s A German Requiem on November 10, 11, and 12, 2016—a work that Guscott performed on many occasions with the Chorus—will be dedicated to her memory.

One of Guscott’s many solo performances with the Symphony of Oak Park and River Forest under Friedman was of Mahler’s Resurrection Symphony on November 16, 2003. A live recording of her singing the fourth movement—Urlicht—is available in the link below.

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McBurney

Gerard McBurney (Dan Rest photo)

On November 13, 2005—under the leadership of Martha Gilmer, vice president of artistic administration, and composer and writer Gerard McBurney—the Chicago Symphony Orchestra launched Beyond the Score with an in-depth analysis followed by a complete performance of Strauss’s Ein Heldenleben. Daniel Harding conducted.

“The introduction deftly mixed vintage photos projected onto a huge overhead screen, excerpts from Strauss’s letters, commentary from his contemporaries, and short excerpts from the tone poem itself,” wrote Wynne Delacoma in the Chicago Sun-Times. “The pacing was seamless, the information on Strauss and his era coming in easily digestible but never watered-down nuggets. When the CSO played the entire work straight through after intermission, the large audience couldn’t help but feel like newly minted connoisseurs. Enjoying subtleties well below the surface beauties of Strauss’s tone poem, they were attentive, at times rapt. McBurney and his colleagues at the CSO succeeded brilliantly with the most difficult aspect of these kinds of programs: keeping the focus on the music.”

In May 2006, McBurney officially joined the staff of the CSOA as artistic programming advisor. Since then, the Beyond the Score concept evolved into freer and more vivid presentations and collaborations with a wide variety of art collections, scholars, libraries, folk musicians, and actors from all over the world.

A Pierre Dream

A Pierre Dream, November 14, 2014 (Todd Rosenberg photo)

Highlights of the series have included thorough analyses of Elgar’s Enigma Variations, Holst’s The Planets, and Shostakovich’s Fourth Symphony. Rachmaninov’s Isle of the Dead and Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde were presented as seamless dramatizations, and Pierre Boulez led Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin and closely advised on Schoenberg’s Pierrot lunaire. Concertmaster Robert Chen was featured in Rimsky-Korsakov’s Sheherazade; and Gwendolyn Brown, an alumna of Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Ryan Opera Center, performed Negro spirituals as part of Dvořák’s New World Symphony. In 2014, McBurney—collaborating with architect Frank Gehry—presented a special and comprehensive examination of music by Pierre Boulez.

This article also appears here.

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