You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘George P. Upton’ tag.

Theodore Thomas in 1876 (J. Gurney & Son photo)

Wishing a very happy birthday to our founder and first music director Theodore Thomas on the occasion of his 184th birthday!

“During his musical career, Theodore Thomas conducted more than ten thousand concerts, and on a majority of his programs, he placed a work by Beethoven. Nevertheless, it was his invariable rule to study each work anew whenever he gave it, and he was so particular in regard to everything that concerned the music of Beethoven that I have known him to spend an entire evening verifying the opus number of a Beethoven quartet before he would copy it on a program for the printer.”

—excerpt from the preface to Talks About Beethoven’s Symphonies by Theodore Thomas and Frederick Stock, edited by Rose Fay Thomas, 1930.

“The man who does not know Shakespeare is to be pitied; and the man who does not understand Beethoven and has not been under his spell has not half lived his life.”

—excerpt from the epigraph to Theodore Thomas: A Musical Autobiography by Theodore Thomas, edited by George P. Upton, 1905.

Happy, happy birthday!

Another unexpected donation arrived last week, and it is nothing short of spectacular: the first numbered set of a limited first edition printing of Theodore Thomas‘s autobiography.

Copy number one

Copy number one

Our founder and first music director completed his autobiography during the summer of 1904, just before the opening of the Orchestra’s fourteenth season. It was first published in two volumes—Life Work and Concert Programmes—on April 5, 1905, just three months after his unexpected death on January 4.

Inscription from editor George P. Upton to publisher Ogden Trevor McClurg

Inscription from editor George P. Upton to publisher Ogden Trevor McClurg

And what makes this donation all the more remarkable is that it bears an inscription from the editor to the publisher A. C. McClurg & Co. The inscription reads: “To Ogden Trevor McClurg / These memorials of the great conductor / with its very cordial regards of their compile[?] / Geo. P. Upton / Chicago May 2, 1905”.

In the preface, Thomas wrote: “. . . I never intended to write my autobiography, or anything else; I desired only to preserve my programmes—representing over half a century of a very important part of the history of music in America—in some permanent form, and this is the result. I am happy to say that at my request, Mr. George P. Upton, whose interest in the cause of good music has been of such marked benefit to Chicago for fifty years, has undertaken the laborious task of compiling and editing this publication, of selecting and classifying the programmes to be printed, and of writing such explanations as they have required.”

The limited edition open to the title page

The limited edition of the autobiography open to the title page of volume one

The standard issue of the book with volume two opened to an illustration of Thomas sitting at his desk

The standard issue of the autobiography with volume two opened to an illustration of Thomas sitting at his desk

From left to right: the 1905 two-volume limited edition, the 1905 two-volume standard edition, and the 1964 reprint

From left to right: the 1905 two-volume limited edition, the 1905 two-volume standard edition, and the 1964 reprint

“Never was leader more strict, but never was leader more just and kind. The men knew that he had their interests at heart, that he was thoroughly loyal to them, that he would sacrifice himself to them, as he did more than once, and that in moments of success he always unselfishly sunk himself out of sight and awarded them the praise. When off duty and enjoying himself with his players at their informal functions, he was a boy with them, and led their mirth as enthusiastically as he led their music. Even in rehearsals, when all was going well, he kept his players in the best of humor with his hearty jokes or quiet sarcasms, but when things were not going well, Jove frowned. But the strongest reason why his men not only respected, but had a feeling of affection for him, was because they never questioned his superior attainments, and appreciated the kind, humane, loving nature behind his austere seeming.”

— “Reminiscence and Appreciation” from Theodore Thomas, edited by George P. Upton, 1905.

Happy birthday, Maestro!

the vault

Theodore Thomas

csoarchives twitter feed

chicagosymphony twitter feed

ChicagoSymphony Instagram

disclaimer

The opinions expressed here are mine and do not necessarily reflect those of my employer.

visitors

  • 361,865 hits
%d bloggers like this: